Difference between revisions of "Adventist Youth Honors Answer Book/First aid/Two person carry"

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One two-person carry that can be used in emergencies is shown here.  Two rescuers position themselves beside the casualty, on the same side, one at the level of the chest and the other at the thighs. The rescuers interlock adjacent arms as shown, while they support the victim at the shoulders and knees.  In unison, they lift the victim and roll his front toward theirs.  '''This carry must not be used to move seriously injured persons.'''
 
One two-person carry that can be used in emergencies is shown here.  Two rescuers position themselves beside the casualty, on the same side, one at the level of the chest and the other at the thighs. The rescuers interlock adjacent arms as shown, while they support the victim at the shoulders and knees.  In unison, they lift the victim and roll his front toward theirs.  '''This carry must not be used to move seriously injured persons.'''
 
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[[Category:Adventist Youth Honors Answer Book|{{SUBPAGENAME}}]]

Revision as of 08:42, 17 June 2007

Two-person carry

Manual carries are tiring for the bearer(s) and involve the risk of increasing the severity of the casualty’s injury. In some instances, however, they are essential to save the casualty’s life. Although manual carries are accomplished by one or two bearers, the two-man carries are used whenever possible. They provide more comfort to the casualty, are less likely to aggravate his injuries, and are also less tiring for the bearers, thus enabling them to carry him farther.

One two-person carry that can be used in emergencies is shown here. Two rescuers position themselves beside the casualty, on the same side, one at the level of the chest and the other at the thighs. The rescuers interlock adjacent arms as shown, while they support the victim at the shoulders and knees. In unison, they lift the victim and roll his front toward theirs. This carry must not be used to move seriously injured persons.