Difference between revisions of "Adventist Youth Honors Answer Book/Outreach/Family Life (General Conference)"

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m (9. Plan and conduct a fire drill in your home.)
m (11. Study the recreational activities of your family. What improvements, if any, can be made?)
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==10. List five ways you can show concern for or interest in your neighbors.==  
 
==10. List five ways you can show concern for or interest in your neighbors.==  
 
==11. Study the recreational activities of your family. What improvements, if any, can be made?==
 
==11. Study the recreational activities of your family. What improvements, if any, can be made?==
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Specific areas to consider are sedentary activities versus physical activities.  You cannot replace ''all'' sedentary activities with physical ones, but most families can improve in this area. 
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Another area to consider is television viewing.  Watching TV does not require any interaction between family members.  Instead, everyone's eyes are glued to the tube, and no one is talking to another.  If someone ''does'' talk during the program, it is often met with glares or a "be quiet!"  It is far better to engage in activities that require interaction among family members, such as board games.
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Do your families activities require a lot of driving to and fro from one place to another?  This is often the case in a large family where one child has ballet, another has soccer practice, and another has piano lessons.  Shuttling people from one event to another can be stressful!  Why not suggest activities that everyone can enjoy instead of activities that only one person does?  It's OK to have personal interests, but be careful that your family activities don't reduce the parents to little more than chauffeurs and taxi drivers.
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What other improvements can you think of?
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==References==
 
==References==
  
 
[[Category:Adventist Youth Honors Answer Book|{{SUBPAGENAME}}]]
 
[[Category:Adventist Youth Honors Answer Book|{{SUBPAGENAME}}]]

Revision as of 18:56, 22 December 2006

Template:Honor header

1. Explain the roles of the father, mother, sister, and brother as given in the Bible and Spirit of Prophecy.

2. What is the difference between self-respect and pride? Write a paragraph about some of the things that make you feel good about your family. Include the things you are proud of and your family's good qualities and accomplishments.

3. Do one of the following in your home for one week:

a. Dust and keep the floors clean

b. Wash the clothes

c. Wash the dishes

d. Properly dispose of garbage

4. Care for the younger members of your family or a neighbor's family for at least a couple of hours.

5. Make a list of some of the things your family spends money on. Explain your responsibility to the finances of your family.

6. Make a list of family activities that you think your family would enjoy.

7. How would you make a family worship meaningful for preschoolers, juniors, and teens? Plan and conduct a family worship for one of these age groups.

8. Know what to do in the following circumstances in your home:

a. Accident

b. Bad storm

c. Financial crisis

d. Fire

e. Loss of a relative

9. Plan and conduct a fire drill in your home.

Arrange this with your family ahead of time. Choose a meeting place well away from the house so that if a real fire occurs, everyone will know to go there, and if anyone is missing, it can be assumed that they are still in the house. Go over the escape routes with everyone.

10. List five ways you can show concern for or interest in your neighbors.

11. Study the recreational activities of your family. What improvements, if any, can be made?

Specific areas to consider are sedentary activities versus physical activities. You cannot replace all sedentary activities with physical ones, but most families can improve in this area.

Another area to consider is television viewing. Watching TV does not require any interaction between family members. Instead, everyone's eyes are glued to the tube, and no one is talking to another. If someone does talk during the program, it is often met with glares or a "be quiet!" It is far better to engage in activities that require interaction among family members, such as board games.

Do your families activities require a lot of driving to and fro from one place to another? This is often the case in a large family where one child has ballet, another has soccer practice, and another has piano lessons. Shuttling people from one event to another can be stressful! Why not suggest activities that everyone can enjoy instead of activities that only one person does? It's OK to have personal interests, but be careful that your family activities don't reduce the parents to little more than chauffeurs and taxi drivers.

What other improvements can you think of?

References