Difference between revisions of "Adventist Youth Honors Answer Book/Stars/Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, and the North Star"

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(New page: 300px ;Northern Hemisphere: These stars and constellations can be seen from anywhere north of the tropics in the Northern Hemisphere (they are more ...)
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;Northern Hemisphere: These stars and constellations can be seen from anywhere north of the tropics in the Northern Hemisphere (they are more difficult to see in the tropics, and the North Star cannot be seen at all from the Southern Hemisphere).  The North Star never appears to move at all, and it can be found due north.  The Big Dipper and Cassiopeia will rotate around the North Star (also known as Polaris, since it is directly above the North Pole).  When drawing the diagram, be sure to include the seven stars in the Big Dipper, the five in Cassiopeia, and the North Star.  Make sure that the two stars at the end of the Big Dipper's "bowl" point to the North Star.  Cassiopeia should be shaped like a somewhat flattened "W".
 
;Northern Hemisphere: These stars and constellations can be seen from anywhere north of the tropics in the Northern Hemisphere (they are more difficult to see in the tropics, and the North Star cannot be seen at all from the Southern Hemisphere).  The North Star never appears to move at all, and it can be found due north.  The Big Dipper and Cassiopeia will rotate around the North Star (also known as Polaris, since it is directly above the North Pole).  When drawing the diagram, be sure to include the seven stars in the Big Dipper, the five in Cassiopeia, and the North Star.  Make sure that the two stars at the end of the Big Dipper's "bowl" point to the North Star.  Cassiopeia should be shaped like a somewhat flattened "W".
 
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[[Category:Adventist Youth Honors Answer Book|{{SUBPAGENAME}}]]

Revision as of 09:00, 17 June 2007

Dipper polaris cass.png
Northern Hemisphere
These stars and constellations can be seen from anywhere north of the tropics in the Northern Hemisphere (they are more difficult to see in the tropics, and the North Star cannot be seen at all from the Southern Hemisphere). The North Star never appears to move at all, and it can be found due north. The Big Dipper and Cassiopeia will rotate around the North Star (also known as Polaris, since it is directly above the North Pole). When drawing the diagram, be sure to include the seven stars in the Big Dipper, the five in Cassiopeia, and the North Star. Make sure that the two stars at the end of the Big Dipper's "bowl" point to the North Star. Cassiopeia should be shaped like a somewhat flattened "W".