Adventist Youth Honors Answer Book/Outreach/Disciples and Apostles

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Disciples and Apostles
North American Division

Outreach

Skill Level 2
Year of Introduction: 2016


Contents

Contents


1. Define the following terms by researching them in a reputable Christian literary source and discuss their meaning with your unit, instructor, or a pastor.

a. Disciple

Disciple - Someone who is called by God. “During Jesus' earthly ministry, and during the days of the early church, the term that was used most frequently to designate one of Jesus' followers was "disciple" (mathetes) 262 times.” “Called to a Relationship with God. The roots of biblical discipleship go deep into the fertile soil of God's calling. That calling is expressed in the pattern of divine initiative and human response that constitutes the heart of the biblical concept of covenant, manifested in the recurrent promise, "I will be your God, and you shall be my people." That call from Yahweh is reiterated in the call of Jesus, when he said, "Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest" ( Matt 11:28 ). God has called his people to represent him on the earth, to be with him in every circumstance of life, to be transformed in personal character to be like him. That calling is at the heart of biblical discipleship, both in the Old and New Testaments.” – Baker’s Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology

b. Apostle

Apostle - Someone who is sent out with a message. Pre-Christian use of the Greek term apostolos as one who is sent or a messenger is rare, more commonly it was referring to an ambassador or emissary. However the post-Christian use of the term is one sent to the churches by an authority with a message. The use of the word as a noun was found seventy-nine times in the New Testament (10 in the gospels, 28 times in Acts, 38 times in the Epistles, and three times in Revelation). Only once (Heb 3:1) is it used to refer directly to Christ. – Paraphrased from Baker’s Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology

c. Missionary

2. For the following questions, provide not only the answer, but also the Bible text(s) where you found the answer(s).

a. What are the names of the 12 original disciples called by Jesus?

This is a quick and creative way to learn the names of the 12 disciples (and Matthias...and Paul).

To the tune of "Jesus Loves Me".

Jesus called them one by one,

Peter, Andrew, James and John,

Next, came Philip, Thomas too,

Matthew and Bartholomew.


Chorus: Yes, Jesus called them,

Yes, Jesus called them,

Yes, Jesus called them,

He called them one by one.


James the one they called the less,

Simon, also Thaddeus,

Twelfth apostle Judas made,

Jesus was by him betrayed.


Repeat chorus


Matthias then took Judas' place,

To preach to men of every race,

Paul three preaching trips did make,

And went to Rome for Jesus' sake.

b. Name at least two Old Testament disciples.

Abram (Gen 12:1), Moses (Ex 3:10), Elisha (1 Kings 19:19), there are so many more.

c. Most Christian denominations refer to Saul of Tarsus as the Apostle Paul. How can they be so certain of his calling?

3. Consider the following questions and share your understanding using any creative medium (an opinion paper, a drawing, a video, a computer post with pictures, a poem, a song, a dramatic performance, etc.).

a. At what point did Jesus’ twelve disciples transition to apostles?

b. Can you be an apostle or a missionary without being a disciple?

c. What is one similarity between apostles, disciples and missionaries?

d. What is a similarity and a difference between an apostle, a missionary, and a prophet?

Similarity – Called to spread the gospel of Jesus. They are followers of Christ.

Difference – The biblical apostles were chosen from the disciples and were commissioned by Jesus. Later apostles were appointed, like Paul, Andronicus, and Junias

e. Considering Matthew 28:19-20, can a true disciple follow Christ without filling some apostolic or missionary role?

Matthew 28:19-20 (NKJV)
And Jesus, walking by the Sea of Galilee, saw two brothers, Simon called Peter, and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea; for they were fishermen. Then He said to them, “Follow Me, and I will make you fishers of men.” They immediately left their nets and followed Him. Going on from there, He saw two other brothers, James the son of Zebedee, and John his brother, in the boat with Zebedee their father, mending their nets. He called them, and immediately they left the boat and their father, and followed Him.


4. Do one of the following:

a. Read Matthew 4:18-22 and briefly describe or demonstrate through a creative medium the biblical account of how the first disciples were called to follow Christ. Also demonstrate the significance and impact these callings had on the future of the gospel.

Matthew 4:18-22 (NKJV)
And Jesus, walking by the Sea of Galilee, saw two brothers, Simon called Peter, and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea; for they were fishermen. Then He said to them, “Follow Me, and I will make you fishers of men.” They immediately left their nets and followed Him. Going on from there, He saw two other brothers, James the son of Zebedee, and John his brother, in the boat with Zebedee their father, mending their nets. He called them, and immediately they left the boat and their father, and followed Him.


Jesus called out to Peter and his brother Andrew, two fishermen as they were casting their nets. They immediately left what they were doing without question to follow.

On the same account, Jesus saw James and John and called out to them. With a similar reaction, they dropped what they were doing to follow the Lord.

Teaching point: DEMONSTRATE could mean a "drawing" or "presentation" or "diorama" type of project that not only tells their story way back then, but also the EFFECT that their choice makes on our lives and hearts today.

Teachers can emphasize the "leaving everything" or how these first disciples became major players in the ministry of the church, especially in its starts as show in Acts 1-8 and 12. Peter is a significant leader for decades, giving the key Pentacost sermon among other leadership roles. James was the first disciples to die a martyrs death, while John was the one to live the longest, contributing the Apocalyptic book Revelation (with its message for our present and future).

b. Read Acts 2 individually or with a group. Briefly describe or demonstrate through a creative medium what took place at Pentecost and determine how this event impacted the future of the Christian church.

You can use your personal Bible to read this chapter or find it online at BibleGateway.

The day of Pentecost is recorded as one of the most significant acts of the Bible. The Holy Spirit came upon the disciples, baptizing them with the spirit. They were able to speak in different languages (tongues) that were clearly understood by those who witnessed firsthand the power of the Lord.

Teaching point: DEMONSTRATE could mean a "drawing" or "presentation" or "diorama" type of project that not only tells their story way back then, but also the EFFECT that their choice makes on our lives and hearts today.

The idea that Christianity was a message for "all nations" began at Pentecost, though at first, it was understood to mean that JEWS of any nation had the right to hear and understand and become Christians (at that time practiced as a sect of Judaism). However, as events unfolded (Cornelius, Paul's conversion and mission work to the gentiles) it came to be understood as the opening lines for a global message that could be preached to "every nation, kindred, tongue, and people."

5. Read Acts 9:1-31. Based on your reading, from each of the three perspectives (Saul, Ananias, and a Christian in Jerusalem), discuss or role-play answers to the following:

You can use your personal Bible to read these verses or find it online at BibleGateway.

a. Could, would, or should Paul be trusted by the early Christian believers after his conversion?

He was still viewed as a killer of Christians, one that could not be trusted. They looked at him as if he had a plan to kill them by becoming one of them. Barnabas assisted him in integrating into the Christian community in Jerusalem. BibleGateway.com link

They viewed him in this fashion since he had been their persecutor prior to his conversion. Acts 8:1-3 BibleGateway link

b. Must we go to God to be converted or does He come to us to offer conversion, no matter where we are or what we are doing?

Many individuals live a life of sin before coming into the church.

6. Read Chapter 2 of the book The Acts of the Apostles by Ellen G. White entitled, “The Training of the Twelve”. Individually or with a group, consider the methods Christ used to train His disciples. Determine if those exact methods would still work today, or would there be modern equivalents that could be used to train people to be disciples of God.

You can read the chapter on your device (EGW app, app stores) or follow this link for the official EGW Estate writings website.

Teaching Points:

  • He choose those who were not already caught up in their own philosophy.
  • He preached to others in their presence and an example.
  • He walked and talked with each of them.
  • He spoke about Heaven as they listened.
  • He did not give orders or commands, but allowed them to make decisions on their own to follow Him.

7. With a group, role-play a specific scene from the life of a disciple, an apostle or a missionary of your choice. Briefly explain why you chose this scene and why you think it illustrates their calling from God.

8. From what you have learned in studying these subjects, is it possible for there to be an Apostle in the Seventh-day Adventist church today? How about during any point during the time period since the mid-1840s?

9. Illustrate through drawings, sketches, or photographs the travels of Paul as he proclaimed the gospel to the world.

a. Be sure to capture some of the cultural icons that Paul was facing while preaching Christianity to the secular gentile world. How do these differ from the secular cultural icons of today?

Pathfinders are encouraged to explore the options available that would clearly outline Paul’s travels as he ministered.

This can include images from FREE IMAGE websites like flickr.com and Google images (tools ==> useage rights ==> labeled for reuse) Sample link for "Paul apostle missionary" images

Teaching idea: Divide the kids into groups. Have each group research pictures on four of the locations Paul stopped and download, print, or capture one or two images from each of those cities. Attach these images to a centralized map of Paul's missionary journeys. If done digitally, a Powerpoint set of slides with one page for EACH JOURNEY would be PLENTY to fulfill this requirement.

Teaching idea: Take pictures of the Pathfinders "freeze framing" one scene from four of the cities Paul visited on each journey. Attach them to a missionary journeys map, either in print or digital form. Costuming would be cool, but "modern interpretations" would also be appropriate.

b. All Biblical scholars agree that there were at least three Pauline missionary journeys as described in the 28 Chapters of Acts. Some Christians hold that there was a fourth and possibly a fifth journey that are alluded to in the lost chapters of Acts (29 & 30). Talk with your pastor and discuss how you should treat these theories and would these additional journeys in any way change or illuminate Paul’s ministry.

10. Over a two-week process, conduct a daily self-evaluation of the quality of your discipleship for that particular day. Rate based on the statements below on a scale from 1 to 10 where ten means you are very strong in that area and one means you are weak. Contemplate your assessment, set goals for improvement, and ask Jesus to provide you the necessary strength to meet these goals.

● Your desire is to please God in all that you do.

● You have a passion to share your faith with others.

● You allow the Lord to lead your decision-making process.

● You pray every day on a regular basis.

● You spend time with the Lord through worship.

● Your life represents Jesus to those around you.

● You reach out to those who are less fortunate than you.

11. State the Great Commission, as outlined in Matthew 28:19-20.

The Great Commission is the concluding statement of Jesus to His disciples and gives a command to His disciples. BibleGateway.com has over 200 versions and thus a variety of ways to read this text. The link shares three common versions - NKJV (Pathfinder Bible), NIV (normal read for many people in North America), and CSB (a new version copyrighted 2017)

BibleGateway.com Great Commission

Matthew 28:19-20 (NKJV)
And Jesus, walking by the Sea of Galilee, saw two brothers, Simon called Peter, and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea; for they were fishermen. Then He said to them, “Follow Me, and I will make you fishers of men.” They immediately left their nets and followed Him. Going on from there, He saw two other brothers, James the son of Zebedee, and John his brother, in the boat with Zebedee their father, mending their nets. He called them, and immediately they left the boat and their father, and followed Him.


a. List three specific roles this text defines as part of a missionary or apostolic calling.

The verbs show us the roles we must take in this part of discipleship.
GO
MAKE DISCIPLES
BAPTIZE

Put another way:

  • Go forth
  • Teach, educate
  • Baptize in the name of the Lord

b. Brainstorm a list of New Testament stories that illustrate the different parts of the Great Commission.

Brainstorm means to let your Pathfinders do most of the thinking with the Pathfinder leader GUIDING the discussion to keep it "within boundaries."

Some possibilities include:

  • Philip baptizes the Ethiopian eunuch (Acts 8)
  • Peter is called, responds to, preaches to, and baptizes Cornelius the Roman centurion (Acts 10)
  • Paul travels throughout Asia Minor (Acts 13 to 26 various stories)
  • Paul is imprisoned, there is an earthquake, and as a result the jailer is baptized (Acts 16)

c. Evaluate and list ways in which modern Christians in your area can put the Great Commission into practice.

This question is wide open. The important elements are that it means stepping outside our comfort zone and sharing Jesus with people outside of our current faith community. This does NOT mean "give and run" random "booklet evangelism" but rather methods that involve all three portions of the Great Commission.

d. Using what you’ve learned from this honor, brainstorm an idea on how you can help fulfill the Great Commission. Talk with your instructor and/or a pastor about your idea and then put this idea into practice for a period of at least one month. Share with your class, instructor, or your pastor how this activity has changed your relationship with God and whether you have seen any effects on others.

Teaching Idea: A simple page, sticky notes, or journal entry would suffice. Encourage the Pathfinders to make the goals DOABLE and MEASURABLE and truly OBTAINABLE with the help of God.

Examples:

  • I will assist two people that I would normally ignore.
  • I will teach someone younger than me (physically or spiritually less mature) one thing I have come to know about Jesus Christ in a way that helps them hear the message effectively.
  • I will spend three hours serving my public community.
  • I will donate either time or money (specific amounts) to disaster relief in my country/region of origin.
  • I will pray for people I am getting to know who are not currently part of my church.
  • I will help my church with the upcoming evangelistic series.

Make sure the Pathfinders have chosen goals that they can reasonably accomplish and completely accomplish. Check back in a few weeks to encourage and confirm completion of goals.

References